Laws and ethics simply can’t keep up with technology

Citing a post 

The Apple-FBI battles are a prelude of things to come. Laws and ethics simply can’t keep up with technology

by : Fellow, Arthur & Toni Rembe Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford University

The observations and discussions around policy making and technology are very current and are becoming even more critical as the pace of technology accelerates.  Not directly addressed, but inferred is the “social contract” that includes privacy and safety.  These are complicated issues!

Ending with a quote from Thomas Jefferson that frames the discussion well:

Thomas Jefferson said in 1816, “Laws and institutions must go hand in hand with the progress of the human mind. As that becomes more developed, more enlightened, as new discoveries are made, new truths disclosed, and manners and opinions change with the change of circumstances, institutions must advance also, and keep pace with the times.” But how can our policy makers and institutions keep up with the advances when the originators of the technologies themselves can’t?

Comcast Newsmakers on Broadband

Amazed by 3-D Printing

Many years ago I had the opportunity to visit a university that had a 3-D “rapid prototype” printers.  The concept was to take CAD drawings, send the instructions to the device and create a 3-D image by laying down layers of material.  They would take a broken part or tool, create a CAD drawing of it, then feed the information to the controller to enable it to be rendered. It was a slow process, but it had the potential to allow for a number of things including the re-creation of hard-to-get and impossible-to-get machine parts, the refabrication of critical tools and dies, and the exact replication of 3-D items.

Fast forward to now.  3-D printing technology abounds with new applications for the technology surfacing every day.  Now, if you want custom insoles for your shoes, that technology is there.  If the International Space Station needs to replace a broken part, a 3-D printer onboard can create it.  Want a pizza – now?  Print it! They are even boasting that a house can be 3-D printed and built in 24-48 hours.  See this link

Kansas Teen uses 3-D printer to make hand for boy

A 16 year old high school kid in the region created a 3-D printed prosthetic arm for a family friends kid who was born without fingers on one hand.  It works!  Article Link.  What a great story!  Now the promise of building replacement organs at a cellular level is near reality.  Printing eyes, bone, livers, kidneys and more is very nearly here.

Article: How 3D Printers are Cranking Eyes, Bones and Blood Vessels
Article: A new way to print cells could make it easier to 3D print organs

I think it is revolutionary and it is changing the way we think about many things.  It has the potential to completely change the distribution model for the secondary parts industries.  No longer will they need to have warehouses full of parts.  What might this do to the shipping and transit industry?  How will this further compress time-frames?  How could it change the field of healthcare and medicine?

Keep your eyes on this trend. It will be a big one and could likely change all aspects of our lives.

Anxious to hear your thoughts too!


Some cool communication stuff from NASA!

I get excited when I see technology in use that may revolutionize the way things are done.  This one is a laser that can shoot info from the moon to earth at speeds of 622 Mbps.  Take a look at the video below and weigh in on how this could be part of our communications future at home.

Comcast Newsmaker’s Interview

Interview with Comcast Newsmaker’s – August 2013

What does the future of social media look like?

I ran across a good presentation on the 10 Provocations for our social future by Cai Yu Lam.  I specifically like the way he calls out:

“Rather than being a brand that does social, be a brand the IS social! “

Comcast Newsmakers: Conversation with Andy Huckaba Councilman Andy Huckaba



The Home of the Future

“There are smarter phones, so why not smarter homes?”

Citing an article from USA Today titled “Welcome to the Home of the Future”

A nice discussion of what’s been tried, what’s coming down the pike and what is here right now. More interesting are the possibilities this opens for innovation and unique application of technologies as our lives become more integrated with technology, social media and the Internet.

This past week I had the opportunity to play with a nest smart thermostat. Very elegant, very simple, yet functional, exciting. No wonder that the leaders of this company came from Apple.  Just scratching the surface on what could be done.

How have you integrated technology into your home?  Anxious to hear your thoughts.

Citing: “Social Media Tips for Politicians”

We’re in the heat of the political season. The primaries have concluded and the general election races have begun.  A common element across campaigns at all levels is the use of social media to brand the candidate, engage followers and participate in a virtual debate.  A good article was posted today in under the heading Social Media Tips of Politicians.  The author has done a good job in identifying how to participate in social media, some good tips on what to do and what not to do.   Enjoy!

Citing: “How Bad is the Spectrum Crunch”

From an article in PC Mag – a fascinating Infographic about the Spectrum Crunch. It tells the story of the incredible growth in the mobile industry and the stress on the spectrum, and most importantly solutions that could benefit us all.   The article may be found by clicking on this link: Infographic: How Bad is the Spectrum Crunch?Infographic: How Bad is the spectrum crunch








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